Friday, March 13, 2009

Burning Question

"PSP suggested ROF of 12, 10 and 8 for different skill levels, now agreed to use ROF 10 universally for all from 2010, MS will start already in 2009 with ROF 10."

The above is from what I described yesterday as a purported press release from the Millennium Series. There are a couple of things wrong with it beyond the awkward English--like the pointless inclusion of the 8 bps ROF which didn't see the light of day though it was initially intended. Even so, it suggests the PSP will follow suit in 2010 with a universal ROF at 10.5.

Today the MS website goes into detail regarding their move to a 10.5 bps standard (without mentioning the PSP alignment in 2010.) What I would like to know is has the PSP already agreed to this and are they simply practicing incrementalism in order to make the change more palatable? Wassup, PSP?

16 comments:

theone said...

Hmmm...this is an interesting argument. Of course there will be those that say that "real" x-ball started without ramping guns and that we should all go back to semi. But, the problem with that is that "real" semi is something that is hard to control and you can have teams that play semi with bouncing guns shooting in excess of 15bps. So, I agree with ramping because it's a cap on ROF that can be measured consistently across the board. *waits for response from paintball "true-ists"*

Anyways, I think that the difference in the PSP's proposed ROF from 12.5bps, to 10.5, to 8 and then having only pro/semi-pro shooting 12.5 and then the lower divisions shooting 10.5, and then "beginners" shooting 8, is an idea that I would assume is an attempt to do several things, (a) provide for more movement/more aggressive play (b) save paint (which, from what I've been reading isn't really happening and DIDN'T happen with the switch from 15bps to 13.3bps) and (c) to not scare away potential players when they see guns shooting at insane rates of fire. I think that the separation from divisional to pro/semi-pro is a bit indiscriminate. Are pros/semi-pro's more "capable" of shooting at 12.5? If anything it's just more of a gap that divisional players are going to have to jump when their team progresses up the ranks of PSP (which is there goal, right? --> higher fees, etc.)SO, I think that the MS putting it at an across the board 10.5 (or 10bps) standard is a step in standardizing the league.

In NBA, NHL, MLB, and other leagues where there are minors there are separate rules and regulations. So, if the PSP is trying to legitimize itself having an across the board ROF, like the MS now has, only further pushes the legitimization movement a step forward. AS it stands now the difference only widens the gap for players who want to move up the divisional ranks and eventually play pro/semi-pro.

theone said...

**meant to say that in NBA, NHL, MLB and other leagues there AREN'T separate rules and regulations.

anonachris said...

Am I the only one who almost reads a little bit of antagonism, or at least slight resentment from the Millennium toward the PSP. I don't know the nature of their relationship, only can guess at it, but it always seems that way.

Either that or its just consistently unfortunate translations. But my gut tells me its a little bit more.

Anonymous said...

you were right the first time. There are seperate rules/regultions.

Not every league alllows body checking, slap shots, two line passes, touch up off sides, (on point) different angles of curvature on the stick.

theone said...

Ok then outside of the NHL, take the MLB then a pretty successful, recognized professional sport.

The Paintball Reject said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
raehl said...

MLB doesn't even have the same rules WITHIN the league - one half uses designated hitters, the other doesn't.

theone said...

OK, I recognize that there are differences between the other major recognized sports but the main point of my argument or at least what I will attempt to argue now is that in these other leagues, MLB, NHL, etc. The difference between pro and minors (i.e. pro/semi-pro and divisional) isn't something as major as ROF. I'm all for the differences in "race to" etc. But, I think that the gap in ROF between divisional and pro/semi-pro IS something that will thwart progression of younger players.

Don Saavedra said...

You are wrong. In basketball, the college games have a different 3 pt. line, a shorter game and a shorter season, with different rules for defensive 3 seconds and the shot clock. The European league has a different shaped key under the basket, different zone defense rules, etc. In baseball, the college athletes are allowed to use aluminum bats.

There are quite a few internal differences in other sports, and none of it is relevant to our sport other than to not set us so apart. We are young, we're still modifying our game by large parts to suit our needs, and that is just part of growing up.

Baca Loco said...

Don
Don't disagree with any of that excepting the one word "our". The competitive game has changed over the years primarily on the basis of two things; technology and the "vision" of a very small group. Perhaps I've invested too much meaning here but in my defense I've spent quite a while wandering around the periphery of the political end of Paintball.

theone said...

I would like to point out that there is a difference between college, minors, and professional in the MLB. Using THAT as a basis I feel like my argument is furthered.

raehl said...

theone...

What is your argument again?

I thought it was that having different rules in different segments of a sport hurts its ability to succeed, but every example you have come up with actually counters that point, so, not sure what your point was....

theone said...

My argument is this, if the PSP wants to make paintball a sport (therefore obtaining more outside sponsors, have some sort of continuity, etc.) then it is important that within the league itself there is some sort of regularity amongst the important aspects of the game. I'd say that ROF is an important aspect of the game which now as it stands prevents divisional players (playing at 10.5) from making the jump to semi-pro/pro (playing at 12.5) because the game is different. Using the MLB (despite the DH situation, which I'd say is not that big of a difference and wasn't actually something that the league initially wanted but was done for $$$ making reasons, etc)the rules from majors to minors (NOT including college because between MLB and college there ARE differences)are across the board the same and that the MLB, out of any professional sport is successful if not THE most successful.

All of the arguments that people have made against my position are either comparing apples to oranges (see college v. MLB [baseball]), NHL (curvature of the stick, etc). While I'm comparing the rules being similar between pro and minor league baseball which are somewhat if not exactly the same (which allows for minor league players to perfect their game in a similar situation/experience.) While having a different ROF is just another example of the lack of parity between paintball being recognized as a sport (read: outside money) or as just an expensive hobby.

Baca Loco said...

Neo,
Your comparison is faulty because it presumes that lower divisional tourney players are accomplished (competent, good) paintball players. Most are not. And the lower ROF creates an environment where they at least have a better chance of developing a more all-around game.

anonachris said...

"if the PSP wants to make paintball a sport (therefore obtaining more outside sponsors"

I don't know if this has been a stated goal of the PSP has it? The NPPL, because they liked to spend money and wanted to spend other peoples money, sure. The fan boys on the internet that think they can be famous and rich some day, sure. But the PSP, in the last 2-3 years?

Sure the PSP wouldn't hesitate to feel someone out. But I seriously doubt the PSP is making -ANY- major rule changes based on this silly idea of "outside sponsorship". Especially not in this economic climate.

Who cares what the rate of fire is between divisions. As far as I'm concerned its a technical issue. The skills will adjust to the technical requirements enforced by the league. Make the rof the same, make it different, who cares?

Just go play paintball and try to be the best (or your best) in the format/division you play in.

raehl said...

theone:

The rules are exactly the same between Major League and Minor League paintball. In fact, they are *EXACTLY* the same for Pro and Semi-Pro. More the same than they are for any other sport.

D1 and down isn't the equivalent of the minor leagues for baseball. It's more on-par with College and High School in your analogy. Hell, D4 is just one step above first-time tournament player.